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Who Can I Believe?

There's a lot of misinformation and myths surrounding the COVID-19 vaccines. Before considering vaccine information from the internet, check that the information comes from a credible source and is updated on a regular basis.

During its 75 years of existence, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recognizes the importance of the trust placed in the science and technical leadership of the agency to keep Americans safe from public health threats.

Below are some of the most common myths and the facts from the CDC that dispell them.

I Heard Somewhere
The vaccine will change my DNA.

Fact
COVID-19 vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way. Of the three COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the United States, two are messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines and one is a viral vector vaccine. Both types instruct our cells to build protection against COVID-19. The vaccine material never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA is kept and can’t interact with our DNA in any way.

I Read Somewhere
The vaccine was developed too quickly and it’s not safe.

Fact
The COVID-19 vaccines went through the same testing as other vaccines. Mass government funding made it possible to run the required three phases of clinical trials at the same time. Once the makeup of the virus was identified, the spike protein’s genetic code was plugged into preexisting technology in development for over 10 years. After rigorous evaluation, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave the current COVID-19 vaccines Emergency Use Authorization.

I Heard Somewhere
The vaccine can make me sick.

Fact
None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19 and cannot make you sick with COVID-19. The vaccines teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as a fever. These symptoms are normal and are signs that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19.

I Read Somewhere
If I already had COVID-19, I don’t need the vaccine.

Fact
Reinfection is still possible and the vaccine can offer more reliable immunity than a previous infection. If you were treated for COVID-19 with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma, you may need to wait 90 days before getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Be sure to talk to your doctor about the treatments you received for treatment of COVID-19.

I Heard Somewhere
The COVID-19 vaccine can cause fertility problems.

Fact
There is currently no evidence that the COVID-19 vaccine causes any problems with pregnancy, including the development of the placenta. In addition, there is no evidence that fertility problems are a side effect of any vaccine, including COVID-19 vaccines. Like all vaccines, scientists are studying COVID-19 vaccines carefully for side effects now and will continue to study them for many years.

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